Pedro López


Pedro Alonso López (born October 8th, 1948 in Santa Isabel, Colombia) is a Colombian serial killer, accused of raping and killing more than three hundred girls across South America. Aside from uncited local accounts, López’s crimes first received international attention from an interview conducted by Ron Laytner, a long time freelance photojournalist who reported interviewing López in his Ambato prison cell in 1980.
Laytner’s interviews were widely published, first in the Chicago Tribune on Sunday, July 13, 1980, then in the Toronto Sun and The Sacramento Bee on July 21, 1980, and later in many other North American papers and foreign publications over the years. Apart from Laytner’s account and two brief Associated Press wire reports the story was published in The World’s Most Infamous Murders by Boar and Blundell.
According to Laytner’s story, López became known as the “Monster of the Andes” in 1980 when he led police to the graves of fifty-three of his victims in Ecuador, all girls between nine and twelve years old. In 1983 he was found guilty of murdering 110 young girls in Ecuador alone and confessed to a further 240 murders of missing girls in neighbouring Peru and Colombia. López was released from prison in 1998.According to López, his mother, who was a prostitute with thirteen children, caught him fondling his younger sister in 1957, when he was eight years old, and evicted him from the family home. He was then picked up by a man, taken to a deserted house and repeatedly sodomized. At age twelve, he was taken in by an American family and enrolled in a school for orphans. He ran away because he was allegedly molested by a male teacher. At 18, he stole cars for a living and sold the cars to local chop shops. These actions led him to get caught by authorities later on in his life. During his incarceration he claims that he was brutally gang-raped in prison and that he hunted down the people that raped him and killed them while still incarcerated.
López said that after his jail term, he started preying on young girls in Peru. He claimed that, by 1978, he had killed over 100 of them and that he had been caught by a native tribe, who were preparing to execute him, when an American missionary intervened and persuaded them to hand him over to the state police. The police soon released him. He said he moved to Colombia and later Ecuador, killing about three girls a week. López said “I like the girls in Ecuador, they are more gentle and trusting, more innocent.”
López was arrested when an attempted abduction failed and he was trapped by market traders. He confessed to over three hundred murders. The police only believed him when a flash flood uncovered a mass grave containing many of his victims. According to the B.B.C.: “He was arrested in 1980 but was freed by the government in Ecuador at the end of [1998] and deported to Colombia. In an interview from his prison cell, López described himself as ‘the man of the century’ and said he was being released for ‘good behaviour’.”
An A&E Biography documentary reports that he was released by Ecuadorian prison on August 31, 1994, rearrested an hour later as an illegal immigrant, and handed over to Colombian authorities who charged him with a 20-year old murder. He was found to be insane and held in a psychiatric wing of a Bogotá hospital. In 1998, he was declared sane and released on $50 bail. The same documentary says that Interpol released an advisory for his rearrest by Colombian authorities over a fresh murder in 2002.

Luis Garavito


Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, a.k.a “La Bestia” (“The Beast”) or “Tribilín” (American Spanish translation of Disney’s “Goofy”)(born 25 January 1957 in Génova, Quindío, Colombia) is a Colombian Rapist and Serial killer. In 1999, he admitted to the rape and murder of 147 young boys. The number of his victims, based on the locations of skeletons listed on maps that Garavito drew in prison, could eventually exceed 300. He has been described by local media as “the world’s worst serial killer” because of the high number of victims.
Once captured, Garavito was subject to the maximum penalty available in Colombia, which was 30 years. However, as he confessed the crimes and helped authorities locate bodies, Colombian law allowed him to apply for special benefits, including a reduction of his sentence to 22 years and possibly an even earlier release for further cooperation and good behavior. Colombian law has since increased the maximum penalty to 60 years in prison.
In subsequent years, Colombians have increasingly felt that due to Garavito’s approaching early release, his sentence is not sufficient punishment for his crimes. Colombian law originally had no way to extend the sentence, because cases of serial killers like Garavito had no legal precedent in the country and thus the legal system could not properly address this case. In late 2006, however, a judicial review of the cases against Garavito in different local jurisdictions found that his sentence could be extended and his release delayed, due to the existence of crimes he did not admit to and for which he was not previously condemned.

Luis Alfredo Garavito was born on 25 January 1957 in Génova, Quindío, Colombia. He is the oldest of seven brothers and apparently suffered Physical abuse and Emotional abuse at the hands of his father. In his testimony, he described being a victim of Sexual abuse when young.
Garavito’s victims were poor children, peasant children, or street children, between the ages of 8 and 16. Garavito approached them on the street or countryside and offered them gifts or small amounts of money. After gaining their trust, he took the children for a walk and when they got tired, he would take advantage of them. He then raped them, cut their throats, and usually dismembered their corpses. Most corpses showed signs of torture.
Garavito was captured on 22 April 1999. He confessed to murdering 140 children. However, he is still under investigation for the murder of 172 children in more than 59 towns in Colombia.
He was found guilty in 139 of the 172 cases; the others are ongoing. The sentences for these 139 cases add to 1,853 years and 9 days. Because of Colombian law restrictions, however, he cannot be imprisoned for more than 30 years. In addition, because he helped the authorities in finding the bodies, his sentence has been decreased to 22 years.
As Garavito served his reduced sentence, many Colombians began to gradually criticize the possibility of his early release, some arguing that he deserved either life in prison or the death penalty, neither of which are applicable in Colombia.
In 2006, local TV host Pirry interviewed Garavito, which aired on 11 June of that same year. In this TV special, Pirry mentioned that during the interview, the killer tried to minimize his actions and expressed intent to start a political career in order to help abused children. Pirry also described Garavito’s conditions in prison and commented that due to good behavior, Garavito could probably apply for early release within 3 years.[2]
After the Pirry interview aired, criticism of Garavito’s situation gained increased notoriety in the media and in political circles. A judicial review of the cases against Garavito in different local jurisdictions found that his sentence could potentially be extended and his release delayed, because he would have to answer for unconfessed crimes separately, as they were not covered by his previous judicial process.